Thursday, April 2, 2015

a cautionary note for all artists on the pitfalls of limited edition prints





Blue Daughter, after 7 years of passing no opinion at all on our large framed print of a painting of Brighton Pier, looked up one day from the morning kedgeree, waved her fork censoriously, and remarked that the artist had done a really poor job of the sand on the beach ...


... and that she wasn't at all surprised that the painting had scored only 27 out of 150.  

49 comments:

  1. Mise, it's grand to see that you and the Hattatts have returned.

    Your Blue Daughter's comment has made me smile, but that wonky birthday cake made me giggle. The cake stand is a perfect launch pad.

    Back when I used to do some etching and drypoint printing, it was a struggle to actually print a consistent edition. Artist's proofs' AP penciled notations were so much easier. I like your Brighton Pier print quite a lot, sand and all.

    Best wishes to you and yours for a Happy Easter. xo

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    1. The Brighton Pier is but a pale stand-in, dear Frances, for those of us who do not have one of your renowned tea cups above our breakfast tables.

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  2. Ha ha! Full marks for detail though, albeit highly enlarged.

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    1. P.S. - Much of my adolescence was spent on that pier. I burnt it down though the power of though alone.

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    2. I know you have that special power, Tom.

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  3. You will have to purchase number 150 now.
    And a wonky cake is better than no cake.
    Welcome back Mise.

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    1. Very wise, very welcoming, very good, Jessica.

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  4. Hours later, we are all still giggling on the other side of the Atlantic.

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    1. What an honour to have an international reach, as they say in media circles, to such nice people as you.

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  5. Replies
    1. Thank you, Heather!!! :-) xx
      (I have copy and pasted the fine punctuation of affability)

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  6. The sand does look like a pretty good rendition of an Aero bar though and has set me craving one two days early.

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    1. It's making me want baked beans.

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    2. Thank heavens I have shares in the food conglomerates.

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  7. Also - 150/150 for morning kedgeree.

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  8. Hahahahahahahaha ….. Blue daughter is wonderful…. I LOVE her !!
    ….. love the painting of Brighton Pier too. I took a rather good photo of the carousel on Brighton beach { even though I say so myself !!! } ……. I only got 1/1 though ! XXXX

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    1. I would say so too, I am sure, dear Jacqueline, even sight unseen.

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  9. Dear Mise, I love that remark from your daughter!
    At that strand of Brighton I collected a lot of pebbles with a hole in them - I think your artist included at least two in his painting.

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    1. I suppose they are emblematic of the evocative seaside doughnut, Britta, and therefore to be treasured. What did you do with them?

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    2. First I lined them up - and put them hanging vertically from a wall of our garden in Hamburg, now they look a little bit lost, but enegmatic, on the long small table of our balcony.

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  10. Ha!! She is so darn cute and am just happy that she is seriously looking at your art!

    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena
    Ellipsis: Dual Vision

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    1. I am pleased to be touching on the Arts, Karena, albeit peripherally.

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  11. Very happy to have found your blog via Britta. Your daughter's comment is priceless.

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    1. How nice to meet you, Pondside! I visited your blog and the part about the tiny feet was so very moving that I added an extra scoop of coffee to the pot this evening even though it is strength 5 coffee, or, as it calls itself, a rich roast.

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  12. I love that painting - Dunne? Groin observation from Blue though!

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  13. Darling Mise,

    We note with delight that breakfast standards are being maintained at the Mise household with the serving of kedgeree. We are the first to admit that our kitchen skills are poor at best and downright dangerous at worst but, even though we say it ourselves, we can make a fine kedgeree.

    One of our parents was born in India at the time of the British Raj and so, in her honour, we have perfected the art of combining fish, egg, rice and spices to produce this most delicious of foods. What a lucky girl Blue Daughter is to have such a feast prepared for her at the breakfast table!

    Alas, however, Blue Daughter would find the sand on Brighton Beach definitely not to her liking. Indeed, there is barely a grain of it to be found as it is pebbles as far as the eye can see....definitely only worth 27/150 as far as beaches go.

    Still, should the Mise household repair to Norfolk one fine day, then miles of golden sands would greet them and a hearty kedgeree on the table!

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    1. We are planning our journey across land and sea even as I type, dear Jane and Lance, and, if the Customs Officials and Agricultural Inspectors permit it, will bring a fresh Aran Islands lobster for your kedgeree pot. Although I have never been to India, the academic echelons of the Mise family have written so lengthily on the Raj that we feel we knew one of your parents and are honoured to know yourselves, honoured to move beyond our more pedestrian native porridge.

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  14. Ah, such words of wisdom so early in the morning.

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    1. And in a different time zone, at that.

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  15. Nice to be watching from afar!

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    1. Hello, John! I must pop over and visit your blog after my feat of responding to all here. It is always a pleasure to see your distinguished chickens.

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  16. Egads. Note to self: omit sand from all future work ... terribly pesky stuff.

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    1. Your own lovely pictures, so blessedly free of sand, have met with no such disapproval in our household, dear Shell. We all give them 1000/150.

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    2. I'm thinking of printing your lovely comment and framing it, dear Mise.

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  17. I have just announced the implementation of your marking system to all staff, dear colleague. I take it 27/150 is a low 2.2?

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    1. Just so, dear Ada, although once one has graded on a curve and applied the donation multiplier, the final grade can be remarkably advantageous.

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  18. What would a third be - my preferred class of degree?

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    1. Anything above 5/150 will get you a third, Lucille, but, in your case and your case only, it is automatically bumped up to an award of Dame of the British Empire.

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  19. Dear Mise

    I would have loved to see you face when Blue Daughter made this wise observation.
    The honesty of children.
    Fond wishes
    Helen xx

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    1. How nice to hear from you, Helen! I'm never sure at any time whether you are in Ireland or on our far emigrant shores (I have been reading uplifting stuff on the diaspora, as you can tell) but I hope the sun is shining very warmly upon you.

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  20. It was all porridge and etchings in the morning kitchen here ... perhaps that's why not one of my four children has much interest in fine art.

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    1. With porridge and etching, it would surely have been Radio 4 in the background, Annie? Or am I blatantly compartmentalising a fellow Neil Diamond fan?

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  21. You know I always think this too but never understood what I was thinking. Now Blue daughter has put it into words. Like me, she will never want to buy a print, only 1 of 1 will do, without the number in the bottom corner.

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  22. She has clearly inherited her mother's keen eye and rapier wit. She'll go far.

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  23. This reminds me of the day that we realised, aghast, that our son's girlfriend had not had the benefit of a classical education and assumed that the XL cufflinks were a humorous reference to my husband's curves.

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You're looking particularly well.

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