Thursday, October 3, 2013

homemade baked beans

Shop-bought baked beans are my enemy, first cousins to that most detestable of foods, ketchup. So I didn't think I'd like the homecooked sort either, but, with my characteristic saintly approach to feeding the family, made them nonetheless. They were jolly nice.

The English muffins on which the beans are served are homemade.
The coriander is homegrown.
The dahlias are from my dahlia-bucket on the terrace.
The butter is handspread.
Hurrah for me.

To make them, sauté a chopped onion in a small casserole dish until soft, add a tablespoon each of cider vinegar and maple syrup, two chopped cloves of garlic, half a carton of passata, and a tin of cannellini beans. A teaspoonful of cumin or a little chilli powder is good too. Stir and bring to simmering point.  Place in a medium oven for an hour (or an hour simmering on the hob is fine too if you don't want to light an oven).


If you're wondering how big a carton of passata, this big.
Like many slow-cooked foods, they taste even nicer the next day.

40 comments:

  1. Hurrah for you indeed. You have the same groceries as me so another hurrah! I do like to have tinned baked beans around so the starving teenagers can get their own lunches occasionally but your beans sound much nicer and hardly any more trouble.

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    1. I have the tinned version as well for starving husbands, Sue, although I only have one starving husband.

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  2. If I made these would they be appropiate to mention over a coffee?

    xo J.

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    1. On a third meeting, Jane. You'll want to bring a batch of home-made truffles with you to the first meeting, and if you'd like to send me a sample batch for quality control, there's no problem with that.

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  3. Lifestyle queen of Blogtopia. And now beanz meanz Mize! xx

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  4. Having rather a basic and uncultured palette I must admit my first thought was 'what heresy is this?' But, reading on, I confess, you recipe does indeed sound rather mouth wateringly superior to the regular baked bean. I'll have to try it I think, you may even get the credit of converting me!

    S x

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    1. I don't mean to lure you away from your lovely crochet, Sandra.

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  5. You are a domestic goddess. p.s. love your dahlias - is there nothing you can't turn your hand to.

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    1. Liquorice allsorts, alas, Elaine. I can't make liquorice allsorts. Look at this frightening recipe.

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    2. He wants locking up - a menace to society.

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  6. A nice simple recipe, and one that doesn't take two days to prepare! I shall try it; The Gardener is snooty about shop-bought baked beans (and I preferred them before they reduced all that salt and sugar - is it criminal to feel like this?) And I'm impressed with the home made English muffins too....

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    1. Yes, the low-sugar things are generally awful, I find. They add chemicals that taste like liquidised tin-foil. Ditto low-fat.

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  7. I never knew you could home make bake beans, they'd always come out of a can eversince I've been eating them. Haha, I know that sounds really silly.

    I'm pinning this for when I move to England, for this is a very English thing to eat it would seem.

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    1. Oh yes, I've been keeping an eye on your wardrobe preparations for the move. Remember an outfit for when you pop over the sea to Ireland on a weekend break.

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    2. I myself have been happily pinning some new socks all evening, as is customary in these benighted, bean-eating parts.

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  8. I admit to not remembering the last time I actually ate any baked beans, since it's not a dish I seek out. However...Mise, seeing how you prepared your version has encouraged me to try my own version as the weather finally begins to grow a bit cooler.

    I definitely am adverse to prepared foods, with all their mysterious extra ingredients that seem to come from chemistry labs. Having said that, I will have to do some research to discover what Passata might be. I am intrigued.

    Those flowers are gorgeous! You've also impressed me with your homemade English muffins. Wow!

    xo

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    1. Passata is sieved tomato purée, Frances, and I imagine canned chopped tomato might do instead if it is hard to find. Thank you, as ever, for your kind and gracious comments.

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    2. Thank you Mise for the explanation.

      You might smile to learn that my supper tonight is a delicious reheated and embellished leftover colcannon (with kale) that I learned to make from Sue.

      Delicious. This time around I made it with dark, spear-y Tuscan kale. I still think it's the bacon that truly gets me past the kale.

      xo

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  9. You have trained your children to eat things you make! Not only a domestic goddess, but a nutritional wonder/ miracle worker.
    Are all the other husbands well fed?

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    1. I may have overstated the willingness of the children to eat homemade food, Speccy, in the excitement of the moment.

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  10. Just checking the larder for the ingredients. I'm pretty sure the coriander is a slimy mess in a plastic bag in the fridge and I only bought it yesterday. At this rate, what with you and Sue both at it, I won't be needing the copy of Eat that has just arrived.

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    1. Every single one of Sue's readers seems to have Eat by now. Surely the shops are running out.

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  11. You'll be reverting to cassoulet soon.

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    1. My advancing vegetarianism prevents it.

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  12. Delcious Mise ...... I love cannelini , butter, flagelot .... if it's a bean I'll eat and, cassoulet when in France ! Yours look lovely and, I might even make them. XXXX

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    1. Oh do, Jacqueline, and blog about your efforts! I want to see shots of your beautifully styled kitchen.

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  13. I have heard of beans on toast but it's not something we eat at all here in the States. I'm really glad to see a photo!

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    1. A fair exchange, Karen, as I learned everything I know about American food from Susan Coolidge.

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  14. Handspread butter? You don't miss a beat.

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  15. Sounds delicious and easy enough that I could make it, though I doubt I could create such a pretty and homegrown scene.

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  16. What a lovely presentation of your homemade fare. Here I'd just pop the top on a can of delectable Pork & Beans add a bit of brown sugar, mustard, the ever American squirt or two of ketchup and top it off with 6 or 8 strips of bacon. A side dish fit to accompany your grilled meat of choice... But sadly never to be served on toast. Visiting here always broadens my world.. Learning about passata (I googled, but thank Dear Frances for asking!) I must confess... I did know about beans and toast... Our lovely daughter-in-love's Cuban mother sweetly prepares beans and toast for her English father. Now if we can just get that side order of grits! Happy cooking!

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    1. I've always wanted to know what grits are and this seems a good place to ask.

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    2. Lucille... Grits are coarsely ground corn kernels (white). The finer ground corn is sifted out in the milling process and is called "cornmeal". This product is used for making fried or baked cornbread. Grits are purchased by the bag and cooked by adding to boiling water. Serve with salt and butter, grits can be the consistency of soup or as firm as mashed potatoes. Grits are a dish you either love or hate...not something you can be ambivalent about. A bit more copied from the Urban Dictionary...."The word grits comes from the Old English. "grytt", for "bran", but the Old English "greot" also meant something ground." So maybe more than you wanted to know... Never ask a Southerner a question unless you have lots of time for a round about answer!

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  17. Wednesday night is 'beans' night in our house - the children having guides and badminton respectively. Invariably a poached egg or two is included too. It's the closest I get to serving a 'ready meal' so I'm reluctant to deviate. I do however do a similar recipe with added chorizo and it's delicious.

    I knew you'd love coriander - I love coriander. With you on ketchup too - yucketty yuck! If I can just start making my own muffins, we really will be kindred spirits!

    xx

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  18. Hi Mise (:
    Everything in moderation can be good or ok... coffee too((:
    So ketchup is not so bad unless our kids eat it on regular basis, I assume. Always enjoyed baked beans in London, these days I craved them while pregnant...so I am keen to try you recipe...

    hugs Z

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  19. Wow Mise, that kinda blows tinned bins on toast out of the water. Sounds amazing!

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  20. I like shop-bought baked beans so much that I sometimes eat them cold (Wait! Come back!), but I'll concede that these homemade ones look and sound mouth-watering. And I don't think I would get away with eating Heinz on muffins.

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  21. Oh dear, I'm playing blog catch up again (no relation to the dreaded ketchup though). I've always been a bit unnerved about making baked beans from scratch...why, I have no idea, but it's worth a try. Our cupboard has tins of it at the moment, I hope they won't be too upset if I give it a go.
    xo J~

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