Thursday, September 20, 2012

For Jane, who asked about the apple bread

It's a disgracefully long while, Jane, since you asked me for the recipe for the apple bread I mentioned. Finding the cookery book took a lot of rummaging, and the limiting factor of the household efficiency model is that there aren't enough rummagers to cope with the quantity of mislaid items, even though I spend every waking moment returning things to where they belong.


The recipe is essentially for normal yeast  bread made with the addition of stewed apple. Because of my compulsion to tweak recipes, my version has departed from the original to such an extent that I wanted to find the original, correct text for you. Everything I bake always converges eventually towards my favourite food, hot cross buns, and so it was with my more recent incarnations of this apple bread.  Anyhow, the version given here is ever so nice, especially, as is remarked, with cheese.


These pages are from The Student Cook Book: Eating well without mixer, microwave or money by Sarah Freeman. There was a time when it saw me through many a dinner party.

33 comments:

  1. I love the idea of all your baking evolving into hot cross buns Mise. Will definitely be giving this one a go, thank you!

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  2. Sounds easy and delicious, and I love that it came from a cookbook that is almost 200 years old.
    If only I had some Caerphilly cheese to go with it. (I just wanted an excuse to write Caerphilly, which makes me think of caterpillar.)

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  3. Hello Mise:
    Strangely, anything which we cook merges towards a burnt cinder either immediately or eventually depending upon the oven temperature and the degree of our forgetfulness. Nothing so edible as a Hot Cross Bun when we are in the kitchen with our matching aprons on!!!

    Clearly Martha Brotherton was a formidable Lancastrian. Her Apple Bread sounds truly divine but, we suspect, so too were here soups, stews, pastries, patés, casseroles, confectionery, biscuits, and hotpots. And, no doubt, Martha was also a perfect housewife, her home polished and gleaming, the aroma of freshly baked bread and newly brewed coffee welcoming the casual visitor or guest. Oh how this all serves to remind us how far we have fallen down the ladder of domesticity.........can we be saved....we do know a good cheese shop!!!!!

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    1. It's quite made my day, Jane and Lance, this mental image of you both flitting round the saucepans with your matching aprons on and perhaps some Britten on the gramophone.

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  4. Mrs Brotherton a Lancashire lass too, this recipe will no doubt stick to your ribs to keep out the endless rain. I must give it a go. 'Bretherton' is a neighbouring village. I wonder if her family hauled from there.

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  5. I wonder, do we have some strange psychic connection. There I was thinking we haven't heard from Mise in a while, popped by to check I hadn't missed a post, and you've just posted! And you've given me hope ... now I know what to do with the rest of these windfalls because a girl can only stomach so much apple curd! And that doesn't taste good with Caerphilly at all!

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  6. PS I just had to check out Martha and her cookbook, she hailed from Salford, and the book was regarded as the first vegetarian cookbook, now you know, or rather now I know. She married Joseph Brotherton MP to Salford in 1812 who presided over the meeting to create the Vegetarian Society, well I never.

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    1. How timely this is, Susan, just as our local branch of the Flat Earth Society is dabbling in vegetarianism after a poor year for the sheep. Would you be free to preside over an aubergine evening for us to continue the Lancashire tradition?

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    2. Indeed I would, please contact me with dates for my diary. I am a little stretched at the moment having been asked to host the annual Lancastrian Mung bean festival, however I am sure I can fit you in.

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  7. It looks as if one needs to have a name starting with M to be any good at baking this recipe so I'm not going to try ( even though my surname starts with M) so I shall wait for Marilyn, Millie or maybe Madonna to knock on my door with a loaf of Apple Bread made especially for me. XXXX

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  8. A vegetarian recipe no less....I met the guy who started the Vegetarian Society of Ireland the other day, and picked apples with the kids in his orchard...perhaps this is fate...I will try this recipe and maybe even make him one too!
    Thanks Mise. You always know just what to do!

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  9. This is utterly charming. I find myself very curious about the last notation, Crackly Caramel. Yum!

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  10. The more rummagers there are, the more people there are to mislay things in the first place.

    My sympathies to Jane and Lance, whose cooking style merges with mine precisely.

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  11. Shhh, don't mention apple cake. We're being held hostage by a Herman Friendship Thing. Send reinforcements north forthwith...

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  12. Hello Mise - you have me sold on this recipe. Just say apple, sugar, and tastes excellent with cheese and I'm all over it like butter. There's the cutest cheese shop down the road too! I hope you and your family have had a terrific summer. We're still waiting for ours here in sunny Scotland. Perhaps in 2013?
    Happy almost Autumn

    : ) Deb

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  13. I'm just a bit concerned that it might be accidentally healthy. Does a slice count as one of your five portions of fruit or veg a day?

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  14. I was a bit worried I had asked for this recipe because I'm pretty sure I don't bake.

    At least not well.

    I imagine it could be packed in a tin and shipped over to me though...

    just imagining.

    xo Jane

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    1. I'm sitting here, Jane, imagining I'm a good packer in tins. How companionable it is for us to imagine together.

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  15. i want crackly carmel bread now.

    Buy the boots.

    The first dryer.

    Is that the cheese Wallace likes?

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  16. The point is Mise that you remembered the request. And I came back to see it.

    Most excited. Am going to bake it this weekend.

    Another way to enjoy apples (we go through about 40 a week no kidding)

    Thank you muchly.

    xoxo

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    1. I do hope it turns out nicely, Jane.

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  17. How nice of you to share the recipe. I've never heard of apple bread before. It sounds nice and I may be inspired to make it...but I've lost my baking mojo. It's quite tragic.

    My favourite food is panettone...and after that home-made hot cross buns. xx

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  18. Oh the relief of not seeing bloody chia seeds or quinoa in the ingredients. You make me very happy.
    Millie xx

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    1. I have never seen a chia seed, Millie, but no one must know that.

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  19. I tend to worry when I see yeast in a recipe lest I happen to have sachets from an underachieving strain and have failure to launch. But I'd love to eat some of that apple bread if someone else happened to bake it for me.

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  20. It is comforting to know we share a compulsion.

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  21. I'm sorry, I'm a slow reader - have only just found your blog and just read the lipstick saga. My favourite is also discontinued, and I'm down to the last few lovely slicks. I've turned into a suspicious-looking dodgy customer who's hanging round the chemists, trying out all the testers and squinting at the back of my hand then leaving the shop, forlorn and dragging my feet, only to return days later just in case I missed a shade. I've got the saddest lips.

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    1. Marge, may you and I be email pen-pals when neither of us can no longer leave the house due to the lipstick crisis? It will be important for us to maintain some connection with reality, such as it is.

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  22. It seemed to me, at maximum occupancy here, that everything belonged on the stairs. Goods were either on their way up, or on their way down. What I could never drum into people was that they should never travel in either direction, empty-handed. But I did resist the stepped stair basket solution being peddled by the paraphernalia magazines that fall out of bagged-up weekend papers.

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    1. I knew you wouldn't stoop to one of those terrible baskets, Lucille. I don't have one either, as I was afraid someone would trip over it on the stairs and go head-first into my faux-mahogany cabinet of WWII commemoration thimbles so lovingly collected from the Daily Telegraph.

      And the rest of the family does the stairs trip empty-handed too; they just don't have the same social conscience as you and me.

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  23. Hot Cross Buns are my favourite food too - especially with a cup of tea and an episode of 'Murder She Wrote'. I must try the Apple Bread though, it sounds delicous!

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  24. I'm impressed by anyone who uses yeast.

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You're looking particularly well.

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