Friday, November 11, 2011

becoming that sort of person

So I was talking about yogurt, and still am, as I have further weighty thoughts on the matter.  I realise it's a niche area and I shan't mind at all if you hum or twirl your hair.

First, I have given up the electric yogurt maker, as yogurt-making on the range works just as well and generates a more holistic smugness.

Second, I don't see that there is a need to be fussy about heating the milk first; it seems to work just as well if you start with cold milk, and it cuts the preparation time down to one minute.  Is that terribly reckless?



Here's what I do now exactly: in a Bonne Maman jam jar (from a hot dishwasher, so that it is very clean), stir together one generous tablespoon of powdered milk, a tablespoon of nice yogurt and enough milk to almost fill the jar. Put on the lid and leave on a corner of the range overnight. In the morning, place the jar in the fridge.  Eat it later that day, or whenever suits, with fresh or cooked fruit stirred in, or jam.  The yogurt seems to keep nicely for at least 5 days (I've never managed to not eat it for longer than that.)

I hear that you can even sieve it through cheesecloth to make cheese; there's no stopping me now.  My sourdough bread is rising as I type. You will soon find me writing articles for the Guardian newspaper on how to live well on 72 pence a day, or seven good reasons to keep a pig.

36 comments:

  1. I am that sort of person too.

    Nothing beats homemade yoghurt. I'm sure the dried milk helps make it thick and luscious. I make coconut yoghurt which is pretty much exactly like Rachel's. Must write a post about it soon.

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  2. You may have changed my life with this post. We buy yoghurt in 2kg tubs which barely last a week. Moreover, you have given me another purpose for those jam jars. Clever clogs. Meredy xo

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  3. Hello Mise:
    We fear that you are rapidly moving out of our league to the point where all pretence has to be put aside and we see ourselves, in comparison, as little short of country bumpkins, peasants even, with none of the sophistication and skills which so readily attach themselves to you. You write of the pros and cons of boiling milk for yoghurt and of soda bread rising in ovens which, doubtless if investigated, turn out to be Agas or similar. For our part, think yoghurt think 'Ski', think bread, think 'Mother's Pride'.

    Alas, we feel we are losing you, if on reflection we were ever with you, to the ranks of Nigella, Delia, Jamie, et al where it can only be a matter of time before the nation, Irish, British, who cares?, is entranced with 'Mise's Meals in a Moment', 'Mise Makes Muffins', 'Mise Menus' [most likely one for each day of the year], etc. etc., the receipts of which will all, of course, have been previously published in the Guardian at the start of each week as 'Monday Morning with Mise'.

    Woe is us!!

    Jó hétvégét.

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  4. I'd love to see that coconut yogurt post, Sue.

    Jane and Lance, even as I pressed 'publish' I fretted to myself that you weren't going to like this, that it was straying too far from your areas of interest, and I resolved that my next post will be a highbrow one about a finely carved antique mahogany chair-leg or elements of Hungarian opera. Please bear with me till then.

    Meredith, the crucial thing with the children is Never To Tell Them It's Homemade.

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  5. Once you start milking the cows to make the milk to make the yoghurt, then you will be that "sort of person".
    xx

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  6. What kind of milk Mise? I've only ever succeeded in yougurt-making-land with whole milk (and the boiling method)...would love to try this.

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  7. I used organic whole milk, Jacqueline - I believe semi-skimmed milk works but doesn't make as nice a yogurt.

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  8. I forgot what I was going to say.

    The Hattatt's got me all twisted up with their consistent use of M's and it's 6:30 in the morning here and I'm on my first coffee.

    It would have been clever That I'm sure of.

    xo J.

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  9. "Leave on a corner of the range overnight", you say.

    A "range".

    But what if I don't have a country house and an Aga? How can I play this Pretty Far West game if I have just a 5-burner dual fuel cooker in a small, terraced London house?

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  10. I will only really start worrying about you when you post that you've knitted your own museli.

    Um, you don't do you?

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  11. I'm looking forward to the post 'Seven Good Reasons for Keeping a Pig'!

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  12. I must try it with warm milk straight from the cow and let you know how I get on. Or from the goat as I'm allergic to dairy - mmm
    We will soon have 2 goat kids going to the butcher so recipes on how to cook them would be highly appreciated :)

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  13. Homemade yoghurt is something I would never have thought of making before! I am now inspired, thanks Mise!

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  14. kplondon, five burners is a lot. How about a hot press; would you have one of those? Or overnighting the yogurt on top of a slightly warm oven in which you are very slowly making, dare I say it, meringues?

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  15. A fine post! Now write about the porridge made overnight in the bottom oven of the range, the look of joy on daughters Blue and Pink at breakfast in the morning and widen the gaping chasm between the arranged and the unarranged. It will also go a long way to making you 'that sort of person'.

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  16. If only they would eat porridge, Amee; if only the bottom oven of the range weren't full of slippers.

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  17. I now feel awful that I buy my yoghurt from Waitrose !! I shall give your system a go as it seems really simple and easy enough even for little old me......I even think that Jane and Lance could manage it !!
    Will we be having a step by step post on how to whittle pegs next Mise ?!! XXXX

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  18. Dear Mise

    Living in North America and getting to your post later than the erudite Europeans, leaves me speechless and also giggling uncontrollably. Such marketing ideas from your readers and if you listen to Lance and Jane you will be a constant on TV (take a back seat all you Allens from Ballymaloe)
    To the future and Mise's Meals in a Moment!

    Helen xx

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  19. 72 pence a day? What a luxurious life you could lead on that munificent sum! I shall continue to eat whatever yogurts are on special offer in the supermarket ..... but I will feel smug in the mornings when I have my homemade rosehip syrup on my porridge!!

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  20. I am waiting for the cheese. Will you have it on some of the sourdough you just made? Perhaps toasted with a bit of jam too? Mise you put me to shame with the yoghurt making .... We do make our own mozzarella and once you start making your own there really will be no stopping you at all. I will wait eagerly by my laptop to follow your progress.

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  21. i would like to channel some of that holistic smugness myself. kudos to you darl. however if you ever veer near the territory of hand made sanitary wear i will have to take interventionist action.

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  22. I saw the cutest little pig calendar the other day {much pink was involved} and it has me thinking there might even be 12 reasons to keep a pig. That's good looking yoghurt, by the way.

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  23. You leave my brain whirling...:)Oh, the options...and here I was yesterday (with our bathroom makeover in full swing) running out to McDonald's for their Dollar Menu Fruit 'n Yogurt Parfait!

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  24. im still stuck on the pig. trying to think of seven reasons at all let alone good ones haha
    they are kinda cute
    ~laura x

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  25. Nothing to do with the yogurt Mise, but I have just found your blog today and am enjoying reading your archives. As the mother of three boys you have given me a real pink fix this morning. I love it here!

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  26. Wonderful Mise...making your own yogurt, I have never been that adventurous...that says volumes about my cooking ability. I am very jealous...sour dough bread as well..another challenge for me! You may be on to something with reasons to keep a pig. :)

    Best wishes Mise!!

    Jeanne

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  27. So looking forward to photographs of you standing proudly beside your handsome pig.

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  28. Just last week I read the chapter on making yoghurt in Elizabeth David's 'Is There a Nutmeg in the House'...and the recipe is almost exactly as how you're making it. She talks a great deal about heating and reducing the milk,so you're one up on her now with your cold milk...I'm very impressed! But what's to become of your beautiful copper pot? Maybe you could post seven uses for *it*...as well as for the pig!
    By the way...I've always greatly admired, and been a bit jealous of 'those sorts of people'...they are on quite a high pedestal in my book...so please take care Mise, homemade sourdough and yoghurt have placed you quite high as well...just don't look down!
    xo J~

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  29. A thousand or so years ago , my new mother-in-law gave me an electric yoghurt maker . Apparently she saw me as a homebody . I fear I disappointed her .... but your method sounds painless and guaranteed .
    And how could I resist Bonne Maman yoghurt ?
    (note to self : empty buttons out of jar first) .

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  30. I was given a "yoghurt cheese maker" quite recently, by someone who knows I have zero luck making yoghurt (regardless how I try, though I don't have a range, in fact only 1 hob works at all). I wonder if it was a concealed dig....

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  31. I just bought my second ever joghurt maker.... we only eat organic joghurts but I found it so difficult to find good honest 'clean' products here in France that I decided to 'start all over again' with making my own... I then can use all the frozen garden raspberries and market-bought straws - but alas, your idea of NOT using a maker is coming a tiny tad too late...
    Thank you for this clever and tasty post - nearly too clever and sophisticated for a lazy bum like me!

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  32. are there really SEVEN good reasons to keep a pig - I'd love to know

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  33. I would do this too, honestly, if I had a range or liked yoghurt.

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  34. I grind my own coffee beans.

    I have a kept squirrel.

    I raise gnats.

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  35. Hi Mise
    Well it is just lovely to have my first comment, yipee! and from a fellow western women with a cushion addiction and I could go on for hours on making a cottage bright without installing floodlights,

    Take Care
    Denise

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  36. I like your homemade yoghut idea. Do you think it would work as well in a Bonne Maman jar in a corner of the hearth? I have not a range :( Will I have to resort to buying an electric yoghut maker? My beer bread has already been consumed today. It is magic bread. Comes straight out of the oven and disappears. I imagine your yoghurt to be a more colorful version of magic food.

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